Natalie babbit

This section's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. May Learn how and when to remove this template message Ten-year-old Winnie Foster is tired of her family and is thinking of running away from her home in rural Treegap. One day, while in a wooded area her family owns, she sees a boy about the age of 17 drinking from a spring.

Natalie babbit

This section's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed.

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Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. May Learn how and when to remove this template message Ten-year-old Winnie Foster is tired of her family and is thinking of running away from her home in rural Treegap.

One day, while in a wooded area her family owns, she sees a boy about the age of 17 drinking from a spring. He tells her that his name is Jesse Tuck and he tells her not to drink the spring water when she starts insisting on being allowed to drink it.

Soon after his Natalie babbit, Miles, and Natalie babbit mother, Mae, take her away with them and explain what is happening and why they did what they did.

All the while, they are being pursued by a man in a yellow suit who had approached the Fosters asking questions about their land the day before. The Tucks explain to Winnie that the spring is magical and grants eternal life to anyone who drinks its water.

They discovered its effects by accident after heading to the Treegap area to try and build a new life for themselves. In the process, Miles had to deal with his wife leaving him and taking their children with her.

They have been living in seclusion outside of Treegap for years, reuniting every ten years and drinking from the spring.

Winnie grows particularly fond of Jesse and his father, Angus Tuck, who teaches her about the life cycle that they are no longer a part of and why she must keep their secret. Meanwhile, the man in the yellow suit has been pursuing the Tucks.

Once he discovers Winifred has been taken by them and overhears their whole conversation, he steals their horse and Natalie babbit it back to the Foster homestead.

After he informs her family of Winnie's whereabouts, they dispatch him and the local constable to return her. However, he breaks away and rides ahead of the constable for he has a selfish motive for finding Winnie. When the man in the yellow suit arrives at the Tucks' farm he informs them that he has been searching for them for years.

Miles' wife and children had come to live with his family when he was a boy and he heard rumors of their secret. He intensified his search within the previous six months. He then informs the angry family that he told the Fosters where Winnie was and that he has received a bounty in exchange for her safe return: The man in the yellow suit then further angers the Tucks when he tells them that he plans to gather the water from the spring and sell it to the public.

When they angrily refuse his offer to be partners in the venture because they desire privacy over the money, he then declares he does not need their permission to sell the water and begins to take Winnie away. He tells the Tucks that if they will not be his examples, then she will.

He says that a child would be a better example, and there is nothing they can do. Mae, in a last-ditch effort to put an end to the confrontation, grabs her husband's shotgun by the barrel and threatens the man in the yellow suit with it.

The man in the yellow suit tries to escape, while Miles tries to stop his mother from attacking the man. Just as the constable rides up to the farm, Mae whips the gun around so hard that its stock strikes the man in the yellow suit in the back of the head, with enough force to fracture his skull on impact.

Mae is arrested while the man in the yellow suit is carried inside the farmhouse, and when the blow later proves fatal she is condemned to the gallows and scheduled for execution the next morning.

Angus, Miles, and Jesse realize that their secret will be revealed once Mae is hanged, due to the fact that people will understand the secret when Mae does not die from the hanging, so they take Winnie with them and go to the jail and spring her from her cell. Then Winnie takes her place so the Tucks can safely get away.

Although they are reunited, there is no more reason for them to be in Treegap, as Mae is now a fugitive from justice. Before departing, Jesse gives Winnie a bottle of the special water so she might drink it when she turns 17 and follow them and marry him.

She gives it consideration but decides not to and pours it onto a toad because she thinks that if she changes her mind then she can go to the spring to get more. Many years later, Mae and Angus return to Treegap and find that it has changed a great deal — the wooded area is gone and so is their spring; the town has become a typical suburban metropolis.

While there, they happen to visit a cemetery where they discover what happened to Winnie: Though Angus Tuck is saddened by this, he also praises Winnie for choosing not to drink the water. They come across a toad near her grave but they are unaware that it is the same one that she had poured water on years before.

Characters[ edit ] Winnie Foster — The novel's protagonist, she is 10 years old when the novel begins and lives in Treegap, New Hampshire. Her Family is the oldest family in Treegap.

During the story, she falls in love with Jesse Tuck. Angus Tuck — The father of the Tuck children, he dislikes his immortality and dreams of dying and going to heaven. She is happy with her lifestyle wearing old clothes and living in a messy house. She owns a music box that she carries around with her.

She considers it to be "the prettiest thing she owns".Natalie was born in Dayton, Ohio on July 28, She spent large amounts of time in her childhood reading myths and fairy tales.

Her mother (an amateur landscape and portrait painter) always made sure Natalie had plenty of pencils, paper, and paint. Natalie Babbitt was an American writer and illustrator of children's books.

Natalie Babbitt | American children’s book author and illustrator | kaja-net.com

She attended Laurel School for Girls, and then Smith College. She had 3 children and was married to Samuel Fisher Babbitt. She was the grandmother of 3 and lived in Rhode Island/5(K). Tuck Everlasting is an American children's novel written by Natalie Babbitt and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in It explores the concept of immortality, which might not be as desirable as it may appear to be.

It has sold over 5 million copies and has . Nov 02,  · Natalie Babbitt, a celebrated children’s author and illustrator whose ruminative novel “Tuck Everlasting,” about a family’s immortality, found a fervent readership and inspired two films.

Artist and writer Natalie Babbitt (–) is the award-winning author of the modern classic Tuck Everlasting and many other brilliantly original books for young people.

Natalie babbit

As the mother of three small children, she began her career in by illustrating The Forty-Ninth Magician, written by her husband, Samuel Babbitt. She soon tried her. Tuck Everlasting is the fifth book that my daughter and I have read this summer.

Natalie babbit

It is a winning and thoroughly engaging story that has left both of us talking and thinking.

Tuck Everlasting - Wikipedia